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**Y2 EASTER WEEK 1 ACTIVITIES ARE NOW ON-see below!**we are now closed until further notice **

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Hi Hydras and Sphinxes,

We hope you are all keeping well and safe inside.  We are all busy learning new skills too, Mrs Said Hamdi has been learning to sew,  Mrs Khalil has been learning how to cook, Miss Shannon has been doing some gardening and Miss Bentley has been learning the ukulele.  Well done - we have seen a lot of your lovely learning on Purple Mash, please remember to click on save and exit button though.  Keep checking the display board to see if your work has been displayed.  Over Easter, we would like you to have a well-deserved break so we have set you some optional and fun activities to do.  If you want to keep up with your Maths we have reassigned the tasks you have already done to give you a chance to redo and learn from your mistakes which helps with your learning.  We miss you all and don't eat too many chocolate Easter eggs!  

Love the Year 1 and 2 team 

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  • Phonics

     At Green Dragon Primary School we teach phonics using ‘Letters and Sounds’. 

    What is phonics?
    Phonics is the system of ‘blending’ sounds together to read, and ‘segmenting’ sounds to spell. They are both complimentary and interlinking skills that are taught together. You may hear your children use some vocabulary that you are not familiar with that they have learnt in their phonics lessons.

    A phoneme 
    Is the smallest unit of sound that we use in the English language. A phoneme can be made up of one letter as in the alphabet sounds – s, a, t, p, i, n etc, or two letters (a digraph) as in sh, ch, th, ay, ar, or three letters (trigraphs) as in air, ear, ure. Phonemes can not be broken down into separate sounds.

    A grapheme
    Is the way we spell a phoneme. A phoneme may have only one grapheme,for example ‘b’. Or may have several different spellings –for example or can be spelt ‘or’ in torn, ‘aw’ in claw, ‘au’ in naughty or ‘ore’ in more. The children will initially be introduced to one common grapheme for each phoneme, but as they progress through the school they will taught the less common spelling alternatives and encouraged to try and choose the correct grapheme for a particular word they are trying to spell.

    Consonant blends
    Are made up of two or three phonemes blended together quite quickly as we learn to read. Examples are sc, sm, bl, pr, str

    Short Vowel Sounds
    Are the vowels saying their sound as ‘a’ in c a t.

    Long Vowel Sounds
    Are the vowels saying their name as ‘ay’ in day, ‘oa’ in boat or ‘igh’ in night.

    How do we teach Phonics at Green Dragon  Primary School?

    We follow the Letters and Sounds programme Letters and Sounds is a phonics resource published by the Department for Education and Skills in 2007. It aims to build children’s speaking and listening skills in their own right as well as to prepare children for learning to read by developing their phonic knowledge and skills. It sets out a detailed and systematic programme for teaching phonic skills for children starting by the age of five, with the aim of them becoming fluent readers by age seven.

    There are six overlapping phases. Below is a summary based on the Letters and Sounds guidance for Practitioners and Teachers. For more detailed information, click here to visit the Letters and Sounds website.

    Phonic Knowledge and Skills

    Phase One 
    Activities are divided into seven aspects, including environmental sounds, instrumental sounds, body sounds, rhythm and rhyme, alliteration, voice sounds and finally oral blending and segmenting.

    Phase Two 
    Learning 19 letters of the alphabet and one sound for each. Blending sounds together to make words. Segmenting words into their separate sounds. Beginning to read simple captions.

    Phase Three
    The remaining 7 letters of the alphabet, one sound for each. Graphemes such as ch, oo, th representing the remaining phonemes not covered by single letters. Reading captions, sentences and questions. On completion of this phase, children will have learnt the “simple code”, i.e. one grapheme for each phoneme in the English language.

    Phase Four
    No new grapheme-phoneme correspondences are taught in this phase. Children learn to blend and segment longer words with adjacent consonants, e.g. swim, clap, jump.

    Phase Five 
    Now we move on to the “complex code”. Children learn more graphemes for the phonemes which they already know, plus different ways of pronouncing the graphemes they already know.

    Phase Six 
    Working on spelling, including prefixes and suffixes, doubling and dropping letters etc.
    Recommended: the Synthetic Phonics Toolkit

  • statutory SPELLING LISTS

     

 
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